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9 steps to setting up a business in the UK


1. Forming a UK entity

 

When you decide to establish a business in London, you need to set up a legal entity

A. Legal entities
B. Intellectual property
C. Patent Box
D. How GEA can help

 

A. Legal entities

There are two common legal entity types.

1. A subsidiary company, also known as a UK private limited company, is a separate legal entity from the parent company even though it is wholly owned by the parent company. You’ll be liable for UK corporation tax on your profits but you may be able to take advantage of reduced rates of corporation tax depending on the size of profits globally.

2. A UK branch of a parent company, also known as a UK branch, is legally the same entity as the parent, meaning that all profits or losses of the UK establishment are incorporated with those of your overseas parent and all debts and liabilities of the UK establishment belong to the overseas parent.

The type of legal entity that you will need to set up will depend upon your commercial aims. Many customers and suppliers prefer dealing with a UK company, so setting up a subsidiary is often the best option.

 

B. Intellectual property

Protecting inventions, designs, branding, and goods and services is critical to the success of a business starting up in the UK.

 

You should consider:

Patents: a monopoly protection of a new invention capable of industrial application
Trade marks: marks used to differentiate your goods and are capable of registration
Design rights: protect the appearance of a purely functional product and are capable of registration
Copyright: protects the form of expression of ideas and, while not capable of registration, is often asserted with the ‘©’ mark
Know-how: practical information resulting from experience and testing that can be protected as confidential information to maintain its secrecy and therefore is not capable of registration
Goodwill: goodwill, custom and exclusive right to carry on a business under the business name. Goodwill is not strictly an IP right and is not capable of registration.
Registering your IP rights is an important investment that generates significant practical, commercial and legal benefits.

Intellectual property costs

Patents Trade marks Design rights
Application fee for a patent application: £20–£30 Application to register a trade mark: £170– £200 plus £50 for each additional class Registration of a single design or the first design in any multiple application: £60 and £40 for every additional design in any multiple application.
Request for opinion as to validity or infringement: £200 Renewal of trade mark registration: £200 plus £50 for each additional class Deferring registration and publication of a design: £40 for a single design or the first design in any multiple application and £20 for every additional design in a multiple application.
Application for grant of a Supplementary Protection Certificate: £250 Application to record a change of ownership: £50 Requesting publication and registration of deferred designs: £40 per design


C. Patent Box

Patent Box is a scheme that allows companies to apply a 10% rate of corporation tax to all profits attributable to qualifying patents, whether paid separately as royalties or embedded in the sales price of products. The scheme was set up to incentivise companies to retain and commercialise existing patents and to develop new, innovative patented products.

Many sectors, including electronics, defence, pharmaceuticals, life sciences and manufacturing can benefit from the scheme. The regime also applies to some other IP rights such as plant variety rights, data protection and supplementary protection certificates (SPCs).

D. How GEA can help

We can:

Connect you to legal experts specialising in setting up UK entities
Introduce you to intellectual property specialists who can advise you on how to protect your inventions, designs and ideas
Offer advice on setting up in London.

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2. UK tax essentials

Which taxes should concern you, what rates should you pay and what are your legal obligations?

A. Corporation and income tax
B. Value Added Tax
C. Pay As You Earn
D. National Insurance
E. Tax incentives for Research and Development
F. How GEA can help

 

A. Corporation and income tax

Corporation tax

You will be asked to pay corporation tax on the profits your UK business makes. You are required to calculate your own company tax liability and file an annual return of your results over the company’s accounting period.You should seek specialist advice on the best way to do this for your business.

Income tax

Income tax is generally deducted from an employee’s salary on a monthly basis, through an employer-run system known as ‘Pay As You Earn’ (PAYE), and automatically paid to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC). As an employee, you will pay between 0% and 45% tax, depending on your earnings.

As an employer, you should seek professional advice regarding the most tax-efficient payment system for your employees and advice on how to calculate income tax liabilities for foreign nationals.

With the right advice from London & Partners, with tax incentives and low corporation tax, the UK is a very affordable place to do business.

B. Value Added Tax

Value Added Tax (VAT) is the UK sales tax. If the annual turnover of your UK business exceeds £81,000 a year you are required to register with HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) and pay this tax on your sales.

The main areas where VAT should be considered are:

Importing goods for resale
Providing services from overseas to private individuals in Europe
Digital businesses which are transacting with businesses and individuals in different jurisdictions: consideration should be given to this when building platforms/commercial websites so that information is captured correctly for reporting purposes
The VAT rate applicable depends upon the goods or services you supply. The standard rate is currently 20%. A reduced rate of 5% or a rate of zero can also apply.

VAT legislation is complex and you should seek expert advice to make sure that you are paying the correct rate of VAT.

C. Pay As You Earn

Pay As You Earn (PAYE) is the system used to calculate income tax on an employee’s pay. As an employer, you are responsible for withholding income tax and National Insurance Contributions (NIC). HMRC provides a ‘Tax Code’ that reflects the employee’s personal circumstances in order to collect the correct amount of income tax from pay during the year.

You will need to register as an employer with HMRC to be issued with an employer reference and PAYE guide.

D. National Insurance

National Insurance is a type of social security. Both employers and employees are subject to National Insurance contributions as a percentage of the gross salary paid to an employee.

As an employer, you must calculate this amount and pay it to HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) every month, along with the ‘Pay As You Earn’ (PAYE) tax.

E. Tax incentives for Research and Development

The UK is a great place to undertake research and development (R&D). R&D tax incentives are available for innovation and apply across all industry sectors. The incentives are most attractive for small and medium size enterprises (SMEs), which can claim an enhanced deduction of 225% of qualifying R&D expenditure.

E. Tax incentives for Research and Development

The UK is a great place to undertake research and development (R&D). R&D tax incentives are available for innovation and apply across all industry sectors. The incentives are most attractive for small and medium size enterprises (SMEs), which can claim an enhanced deduction of 225% of qualifying R&D expenditure.

F. How GEA can help

We can:

Assess your proposal and following approval we can introduce you to an appropriate area of our professional network of tax and law specialists
Connect you to networking groups

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3. Which visa?

Transferring staff to London is straightforward, as long as you understand your options and UK immigration law. This section introduces you to the different types of UK visa.


A. Entrepreneur visa
B. Sole representative visa checklist
C. Which visa?
D. How GEA can help

 

A. Entrepreneur visa

The Tier 1 entrepreneur visa allows non-EEA/Swiss citizens to establish or take over a business in the UK.

Immigration for individuals

In most cases, individuals applying for a Tier 1 entrepreneur visa must have access to at least £200,000 of investment funds (own or third-party). The initial visa will be granted for three years, and further leave will be granted if certain requirements are met.

Investment in a business that owns residential property or is involved in property development or property management is not acceptable for visa purposes.

Immigration for companies

Businesses with a base in the UK may wish to recruit non-EEA/Swiss members of staff. In order to do so, they will need a sponsorship licence. To gain a sponsorship licence, the UK organisation must:

Apply to the UK Visas & Immigration to register as a sponsor
Provide a substantial number of documents that demonstrate that it is an established entity in the UK

B. Sole representative visa checklist

You should arrange for the employee who will set up and run your UK office to apply for a ‘sole representative’ visa, officially called a ‘representative of an overseas business’ visa. Currently, this visa leads to permanent residency after five years.

An overseas business can only have one sole representative. To get additional sponsored work permits for non-European employees, the UK entity will have to apply for an immigration sponsor licence once it is up and running.

You can apply for a sole representative visa if:

You don’t have a subsidiary, branch or ‘other representative’ (for example, a UK-based employee) already in the UK
Your proposed new UK entity will be wholly owned by the overseas business
Your UK operation will carry out the same type of business as the overseas corporation
The sole representative must: be an established senior employee (not contractor) of the overseas business
Not be a majority shareholder of the overseas business (anything up to 50% ownership is permitted)
Meet English language requirements
Be based full time in the UK
Disclose various company and personal documents to support the application, including a detailed business plan for the new UK operation

C. Which visa?

Prospective entrepreneur visa

Ideal for: Visiting entrepreneurs looking for UK VC funding.
Applicants must: Have a letter of interest from (usually) a UK VC, regulated by the FCA, stating that they may invest £50,000+
Resulting in: A stay limited to six months, with no work permitted.
How long to organise: 2–4 weeks from application.
You can switch to a full Tier 1 entrepreneur visa within six months if funding is achieved, although it may be faster to apply in your home country.

Tier 1 entrepreneur visa

Ideal for: Business owners and founders: there are no restrictions on the size of their shareholding in the new London business.
Applicants must: Have access to at least £200,000 (£50k in some limited cases) to invest, sufficient personal maintenance funds and English language skills.
Resulting in: A 40 month visa, extendable by a further two years. Permanent residency after five years, but can be accelerated in some circumstances.
How long to organise: 2–8 weeks from application.
You can only extend your visa beyond 40 months if you invest the required level of funds (£200k or £50k) into a UK business, register as a UK director or as self-employed and create at least two full-time jobs for settled workers.

Sole representative visa

Ideal for: Established senior employees of an overseas business that does not have any presence in the UK. Applicants must not be majority shareholders of the parent business.
Applicants must: Be the UK entity’s first hire and be responsible for running the new UK office
Resulting in: A three-year visa, extendable by a further two years. Permanent residency after five years’ continuous stay.
How long to organise: 2–4 weeks from application.
You must meet English language requirements and be based full time in the UK (personal and business travel is permitted).

Tier 2 visas

The tier 2 visa is a sponsored visa for skilled workers. You will need a sponsorship licence from UK Visas & Immigration and there are minimum skill and salary levels for all Tier 2 visas. Licence: 3–5 months from having first employee on the ground in UK.

Tier 2 General

Ideal for: Hiring other skilled non-EU staff that are ineligible for Tier 2 ICT visas or that are outside your ‘employing group’ (e.g. recruits from other UK businesses currently on Tier 2 visas with another sponsor).
Applicants must: Be paid a minimum salary of £20,500 a year (or market rate for the role, if higher) and meet English language requirements.
Resulting in: A visa capped at six years (up to five years initially with an extension to six years in total). Leads to permanent residency after five years.
How long to organise: 2–4 weeks from application (but a sponsor licence must be in place first).
Applicants must not own more than 10% of the business (unless annual salary is at least £153,500). Your UK company may need to advertise the role for at least 28 days before offering it to a non-EU national, but various exemptions apply.

Tier 2 Intra Company Transfers (ICT)

Ideal for: Transferring skilled overseas-based non-EU employees from overseas group companies to your
UK operation.
Applicants must: Be paid at least £41,000 a year (£24,500 for visas up to 12 months duration), or market rate for the role if higher.
Resulting in: A visa of up to five years in total (or nine years if annual salary is at least £153,500).
Does not lead to permanent residency
How long to organise: 2–4 weeks from application (but a sponsor licence must be in place first).
After a maximum of five years (nine years if annual salary is at least £153,500), the employee must leave the UK.

D. How GEA can help you

We can:

Introduce you to UK visa specialists
Connect you to a network of legal experts
Offer advice on setting up in London

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4.Opening a bank account

When you set up your business in London, you will need to set up a business bank account.


A. Documentation checklist
B. How GEA can help

This checklist tells you what you’ll need if you've set up a company or limited liability partnership (LLP).

A. Documentation checklist

Business customer application form: detailing company activities, projected turnover, transactions details, directors and beneficial owners and principal controllers, including the personal addresses and dates moved in.
Mandate for companies registered under the Companies Act: contains details of all signatories to the account.
Registration of the company: UK companies should provide the company registration number. Overseas companies should provide a certificate of incorporation.
Identification and verification of address: a recent bank statement or utility bill for all beneficial owners, directors and people who may be considered principle controllers of the business.
Company structure chart: detailing ownership and respective percentage share held.
Bank statements: if your company is a newly registered subsidiary of an existing company, you will need to provide statements for your parent company — original or certified copies of the latest three months. If the business is new, you must provide original or certified copies of the latest three months of the personal bank statements of the business owners, directors and principal controllers.
Audited accounts: if your business wants to borrow money from the bank, the bank may request copies of your financial accounts.

B. How GEA can help

We can:

Introduce you to UK visa specialists
Connect you to a network of legal experts
Offer advice on setting up in London

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5. Phones and IT

When setting up a new business you should plan your IT, telephone, internet and TV connections carefully.


A. Phones and TV
B. IT infrastructure and support
C. Internet access
D. How GEA can help

 

A. Phones and TV

You have a choice of analogue or digital telephone lines. A digital system is recommended, as this will give you a single main number together with direct dial numbers for each member of your team. You will also be able to divert and transfer calls.

There is also a cost-competitive digital system called Session Initiation Protocol (SIP), which allows you to install a dedicated internet connection and break out voice calls.

If you want a TV service with international stations such as Bloomberg you have three choices:

Fibre connections: good as long as you are in a connected area.
Set-top box: a quick way to connect, but many channels aren’t available.
Satellite TV provider Sky: requires a dish and in some areas you’ll need planning permission to put a dish on the roof. Permission is not always granted due to planning restrictions.
Be aware that if you go to a major provider such as British Telecom (BT)— and you don’t have a credit history in the UK — you will probably be asked to pay rental up front. GEA can introduce you to one of our BT reseller partners, who can take on this cost on your behalf.

B. IT infrastructure and support

Setting up the right IT infrastructure and securing ongoing support is critical. Use experienced infrastructure providers and a bespoke implementation service. Expect a support package that mixes onsite and remote (telephone) support and:

Includes a preventative maintenance schedule
Highlights changes in requirements
Spots issues early before they affect your business
Defines service level agreements for all equipment such as servers and networks, workstations, printers and desk/office moves

C. Internet access

You have four main options for connecting to the internet, each offering different data transfer speeds and lead times.

ADSL
This is broadband through a normal telephone line. It is suited to users who don’t need to upload large amounts of data and takes around ten days to install.

ADSL 2+
This is fast broadband for businesses. Typical maximum download speeds are 24Mb and upload speeds are 1Mb. Lead times for installation are around ten days.

Ethernet First Mile Line (EFM)
This provides a dedicated direct line for your business. It is ideal for Voice over IP (VoiP), video conferencing and streaming, and sharing large data files. You will need a survey to find out whether you are eligible for the service, which typically takes 30-60 days to install.

Fibre Leased Lines
This is a dedicated, one-to-one data connection between sites. It is ideal for businesses seeking guaranteed speed, reliability and security. A survey will determine whether you are eligible for the service, which typically takes 90 days to install.

D. How GEA can help

We can:

Introduce you to UK visa specialists
Connect you to a network of legal experts
Offer advice on setting up in London

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6. UK Insurance

Insurance: are you covered?

 

1. Compulsory insurance in the UK
2. Recommended types of insurance
3. How GEA can help

 

A. Compulsory insurance in the UK

Some insurance is mandatory. UK law requires that you hold:

Employers’ liability insurance to cover compensation and legal costs if an employee suffers work-related injury or illness.
Third party motor insurance if you plan to use vehicles in the UK; individual and ‘fleet’ policies.
Regular inspection and certification of plant, machinery, tools and electrical installations to ensure that they remain safe for use.
It’s also important to have the right liability insurance to cover legal costs in areas such as intellectual property infringement, service failure, contract breach, data breach, defamation and unfair dismissal.

B. Recommended types of insurance

Although not legally required, the following insurance is critical for most organisations. Your clients, suppliers and investors may also insist that you have these policies in place.

Sensible insurance protection: public liability; product liability; professional indemnity; directors’ and officers’ liability (D&O); property insurance; business interruption (BI); terrorism insurance.
Policies to consider: group travel and personal accident; marine cargo/goods in transit; employment practice liability (EPL); intellectual property rights (IP) insurance.
Life science and ‘medtech’: clinical trials; medical malpractice insurance.
Business protection insurance and employee benefits: key person insurance; business liability protection; business succession planning; income protection; pensions; life assurance.

C. How GEA can help

We can:

Introduce you to UK insurance specialists
Connect you to a network of legal experts
Offer advice on setting up in London

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7. Finding staff

How to attract talented staff. Your responsibilities as an employer.


A. Attracting talented staff
B. Sending people over to scope out the UK
C. UK employment law
D. Which contract type to use
E. Finding employees
F. How GEA can help you

 

A. Attracting talented staff

Attracting top talent is key to the success of your business. Perks may well persuade a candidate to choose your company over another.

Medical, life and dental insurance: private healthcare is one of the most common benefits and one of the most valued by employees.
Flexible working: this can include flexi-time, working from home, job share or part-time working.
Annual leave: the statutory minimum for annual leave in the UK is 28 days including bank holidays, but many employers offer more than this, or increase the total annually. Birthday holidays may also be offered.
Stakeholder pension: it is compulsory for employers to offer their employees access to a pension scheme and to make contributions on their behalf.
Transport: a season ticket loan for the price of an annual train ticket is valued by employees commuting by public transport.
Gym membership: a healthy workforce is a productive workforce. Some employers offer free or discounted gym membership.
Childcare: some employers offer a childcare voucher scheme that could provide substantial tax savings on childcare costs

B. Sending people over to scope out the UK

The intentions of an individual’s visit to the UK, the number of UK ‘ties’ and the structure of an assignment, visit or move can all have a huge impact on how an expatriate will be taxed. Therefore, it is vital that the structure of the assignment and any tax planning takes place before departing from your home country to ensure the correct and most beneficial tax treatment is applied.

Short Term Business Visitor (STBV) agreements are compulsory (with effect from 6 April 2014).In instances where a UK company has already been incorporated, those UK companies without a STBV agreement in place will be required to withhold UK taxes under the Pay As You Earn (PAYE) regulations for all short term business visitors to the UK.

Companies should consult an expert discuss their specific circumstances before sending representatives to the UK.

C. UK employment law

UK employment law is influenced by European employment regulation but does have its own rules and requirements. It is necessary to have an employment contract or written agreement specifying the terms of the employment including pay, benefits, working hours, job description, annual leave, confidential information and restrictive covenants.

There are specific employment laws that provide the minimum requirements for any employment. These cover working time directives, statutory sick pay, annual leave, maternity pay and maternity leave as well as non-discrimination on the grounds of gender, age, disability, race, sexual orientation and religion or belief.

Employers also have statutory responsibilities in relation to verifying the employee’s identity and right to work in the UK, procedures on termination of employment and withholding tax on pay and benefits.

D. Which contract type to use

There are three types of employment contract:

1. Permanent contracts are good for fully engaged staff who will commit to your business on a long-term basis. These contracts can be open-ended, full-time or part-time.
2. Fixed-term contracts are for an agreed period of time, for a specific task. They’re good for when you need the right person for the job within the allotted time and budget.
3. Temporary contracts give you flexibility, with the ability to increase and decrease support at short notice to cater for changes in demand. If you use a recruitment agency to recruit and manage your temporary employees, they will handle the payment of wages, statutory deductions and other related administration.

E. Finding employees

Recruitment agencies

Why do it? Any downsides?
Less stress
Agencies handle the whole process on your behalf, including: advertising, sourcing candidates via online databases and social media; screening CVs and interviewing short-listed candidates to assess suitability; co-ordinating interviews and negotiating offers.

Speed
Agencies have existing databases of pre-screened candidates, ready to start work.

Peace of mind
Agencies have an understanding of UK recruitment and employment legislation, which can prove invaluable. Fees tend to be either success-based or payable in stages, so if your agency doesn’t find your ideal candidate, you won’t be out of pocket; in addition, most agencies offer a free replacement or rebate clause.

Fees
One-off consultancy fees for permanent and fixed-term recruitment typically range from 15-30% of the candidate’s annual salary.

Other sources

Advertising/online sourcing: You can advertise for staff on your own website or via online job boards, social media, specialist trade press and local and national newspapers. However, choosing the best platform for your advert or targeting the right people can be difficult and can be expensive and time-consuming to screen applications, interview and hire. No ultimate guarantee of success.

JobCentre Plus: This Government-run employment agency finds candidates for you. Though it can be difficult to find staff with specialist skills or a proven track record.

Colleges and universities: Try contacting the careers department of colleges and universities if you are recruiting around the end of the academic year (May and June) and are looking for graduates for trainee positions. However, this method is less suitable if you need candidates with specific experience.

F. How GEA can help

We can:

Introduce you to UK recruitment specialists
Connect you to a network of emplyment experts
Offer advice on setting up in London

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8. Setting up your office

How to find the best location for your business and what you need to do to set up your perfect office.


A. Planning the perfect office
B. Negotiating a lease
C. Serviced office costs
D. How GEA can help

 

A. Planning the perfect office

Planning your office begins with thinking about how many people you’ll need to accommodate, how you’ll need to adapt as you grow, and the look and feel you’d like from your office space.

Do…

Employ a professional designer and/or project manager. Choose a fit-out company that has experience of setting up overseas companies in London.
Decide whether you are going to replicate your other offices, or adopt a London look.
Decide if you need separate offices or open-plan. What about meeting rooms or any unique specifications?
Consider your IT needs: server rooms, video conferencing and laptop or PC-based solutions.
Think about how your office could attract the right talent.
Don’t…

Attempt to deal with the statutory regulations, contractors and suppliers yourself.
Assume additional space can be added as the business expands.
Assume that services and costs will be the same as your home market.
Rush. It’s important that you set a realistic timetable and understand how long the search, negotiation and fit-out process is likely to take.

B. Negotiating a lease

The UK’s standard leasing practices are based upon UK land law. It’s always best to seek advice from professionals who can navigate these practices on your behalf. The key things to consider include:

Rent reviews: most leases allow the landlord periodically (typically every five years) to increase the rent.

Rent-free periods: the length of any rent-free period will depend on the overall terms of any transaction.

Lease length: 5 to 15 years is typical, although break clauses can be negotiated.

Insurance and repairs: a professional team should make sure that your premises are in good condition, and negotiate insurance and repair liabilities.

Ancillary costs: explore rates, value-added tax, stamp duty, Land Registry fees and service charges on multi-tenanted buildings.

C. Serviced office costs

If your business can’t commit to a long-term lease, a serviced office is an ideal option. Use our quick guide to serviced office costs per month across London.

Central London North London South London East London West London
Top £900 - £1,100 £550 - £600 £350 - £400 £350 - £400 £450 - £500
Middle £700 - £900 £400 - £550 £300 - £350 £300 - £350 £400 - £450
Bottom £500 - £700 £350 - £400 £250 - £300 £250 - £300 £350 - £400

D. How GEA can help

We can:

Introduce you to London Office specialists
Connect you to a network of property experts
Offer advice on setting up in London

 

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9. Sales and marketing

How do you launch your business in the UK and make sure you reach the right people?


A. Selling in the UK
B. Promoting your business
C. Using a PR consultancy
D. How GEA can help

 

A. Selling in the UK

Start by analysing your successes in your home market. Which customers earn you most profit? Find similar customers in the UK to target.

Create case studies. Decision-makers like buying products and services that have already been purchased by recognisable brands. Offer preferential rates to entice big brands to buy.
Set up a UK limited company. Having a UK address, telephone number and UK-focused website reassures buyers that they can get hold of you at short notice.
Translate your marketing materials. Use local knowledge and language skills to translate your website and marketing collateral for a UK audience.
Rates and prices. Find out your competitors’ rates and prices. And don’t just convert your home country prices into pounds: the UK market might offer the opportunity for bigger margins.
Go to trade shows. You don’t need to invest in a stand to network. But don’t try to sell to exhibitors without organising a meeting: they will be put off by unscheduled sales pitches.
Meet people. The more people you meet, the more chance you have of growing your business by word of mouth. The best sales tool is recommendation.

B. Promoting your business

It’s never too early to start creating a buzz around your new London business.

Get your message right.
You know your business in your home territory, what to say and who to say it to, but launching in London requires a fresh look at your brand and how it could appeal to a new audience, in a new country, with new competitors.

Know your stakeholders.
Take time to discover who is important to your business, what is important to them and how to communicate with them. It won’t be the same as ‘back home’.

Manage your reputation from the outset.
Planning to invest in your brand PR at a later stage? Don’t — start now. Social media has changed the PR landscape and if you don’t talk about your business, someone else might, and not always positively. Remember Warren Buffet’s famous adage: “It takes twenty years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it.”

C. Using a PR consultancy

Write down your business objectives and any background information that might be useful.

Do…

Decide what you’re trying to do and who you’re trying to reach. Are you trying to generate sales? Recruit? Influence opinion formers?
Define your corporate and market positioning. A good PR consultancy will also be able to help you to do this.
Meet and brief. Explain what you’re trying to achieve and ask the consultancy to outline what they can do for you. Ask for any insight they can provide from similar projects or clients.
Once appointed. Take the consultancy into your confidence, share information and answer any questions that they might have.

Don’t…

Don’t overlook other marketing activity. Consider networking with industry contacts and other marketing activity, events, sponsorship, and trade and consumer shows.
Don’t assume the UK media works in the same way as it does at home. There will be differences.
Don’t leave the budget vague. Give an upper and lower figure. It will be a waste of time if a consultancy prepares for a large budget when you only have limited funds and vice-versa.
Don’t set unrealistic timetables.
Don’t ask for the proposal immediately if you cannot guarantee to give a speedy response in return.

D. How GEA can help

We can:

Introduce you to UK advertising, branding and marketing specialists
Connect you to a network of creative writers and graphic design experts
Offer advice on setting up in London

 

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